EFRC NEES Teleseminar - Gary Rubloff

Wednesday, November 15, 2017
4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
2168 AVW
Elizabeth Lathrop
301 405 7801
lathrop5@umd.edu

Speaker: Gary Rubloff, University of Maryland

Director, Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES), a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center

Title: NEES-2 Program and Research Overview

Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES, www.efrc.umd.edu) is focused on the structure of multicomponent nanoscale electrodes and their aggregation into mesoscale architectures as vehicles to elucidate electrochemical energy storage. Since it's inception in 2009, the group's focus is to develop highly ordered nanostructures that offer a unique testbed for investigating the underpinnings of storing electrical energy. The center studies structures that are precise - each at the scale of tens to hundreds of nanometers and ordered in massive arrays - and that are multifunctional - able to conduct electrons, diffuse and store lithium ions, and form a stable mechanical base. The scale and control of experimentation gives NEES researchers an exclusive gateway to probing fundamental kinetic, thermodynamic, and electrochemical processes.

The Center consists of four research thrusts:

  • Thrust 1 Transport in Electrochemical Interphases - Understand chemical formation of interphase films at electrochemical interfaces and their ion and electron transport
  • Thrust 2 Mesoscale Architectures - Synthesize nanostructure assemblies into various architectures to assess the role of mesoscale architecture in realizing energy
  • Thrust 3 Nanostructure Degradation Science - Identify fundamental mechanisms driving nanostructure degradation and failure, and develop methods of mitigation
  • Thrust 4 Solid State Energy Storage - Synthesize solid electrolytes and 3D solid state battery architectures to understand their electrochemical interfaces and consequences for performance of safe energy storage

Biography

Gary W. Rubloff  (www.rubloffgroup.umd.edu) is Distinguished University Professor and Minta Martin Professor of Engineering at the University of Maryland. Following his PhD in physics at U. Chicago and a postdoc at Brown U., he held research and research management positions over 20 years at IBM Research Yorktown Heights - in Physical Sciences, Silicon Technology, and Manufacturing Research -  where his leadership in ultraclean integrated semiconductor processing and diagnostics led to his receipt of the AVS Gaede-Langmuir Prize in 2000. He joined UMD in 1996 as Director of the Institute for Systems Research until 2001.  He has served as the founding Director of the Maryland NanoCenter (www.nanocenter.umd.edu) since 2004.  His research areas have included surface and solid state science, electronic materials and processing, real-time sensing/metrology and advanced process control, nanoscale processes and atomic layer deposition, multicomponent multifunctional nanostructures for energy applications, and biofabrication and biomicrosystems for metabolic engineering and biological signaling.  In 2009 he led the creation of Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (www.efrc.umd.edu), a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center, where he continues to serve as Director. 


 

Audience: Graduate  Faculty  Post-Docs 

 

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